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Alcoholic Autumn Drinks/Cocktails Holidays Recipes Thanksgiving

Drink up! Low calorie Thanksgiving cocktails

Mouthwatering Thanksgiving turkey, mashed potatoes with gravy and pumpkin pie might satisfy our test buds, but holiday meals can wreak havoc on our waistlines. Thankfully, we have some low calorie Thanksgiving cocktails courtesy of Amoretti for those who want to imbibe for 165 calories or less!

The Sip and Fall cocktail (Media/Credit: Amoretti)
The Sip and Fall cocktail (Media/Credit: Amoretti)

Sip and Fall

Ingredients

1 oz. watermelon vodka

1 oz. Amoretti Premium Sour Apple Martini Mix

3 oz. club soda

Directions

Combine the vodka and martini mix in a glass, add ice and top with club soda. Garnish with a green apple slice (optional).

Calories: 98

The A-pear-ently Apple cocktail. (Media/Credit Amoretti)
The A-pear-ently Apple cocktail (Media/Credit: Amoretti)

A-pear-ently Apple

Ingredients

1 oz. Amoretti Premium Pear Martini Mix

12 oz. (1 bottle) low calorie hard cider (Amoretti recommends Magners Irish Hard Cider, Crispin Original or Michelob ULTRA Light Cider)

Directions

Gently combine both ingredients in a tall glass. Garnish with a pear wheel (optional).

Calories: 165

 

 

Mango You Didn’t!

Mango You Didn't!
The Mango You Didn’t! cocktail (Media/Credit: Amoretti) 

 

Ingredients

2 oz. Amoretti Premium Cosmopolitan Martini Mix

1 oz. mango nectar

6 oz. club soda

Directions

Gently combine all ingredients in a glass and fill with ice. Garnish with a lime wheel (optional).

Calories: 115

Ginger Winter
The Ginger Winter cocktail (Media/Credit: Amoretti) 

 

Ginger Winter

Ingredients

½ pump Amoretti Premium Gingerbread Syrup

½ oz. Amoretti Premium Pomegranate Martini Mix

4-6 oz. nonalcoholic sparkling apple cider

Directions

Gently combine the gingerbread syrup and pomegranate martini mix in the bottom of a champagne flute. Fill with the sparkling cider. Garnish with a thin apple slice (optional).

Calories: 103

Categories
Alcoholic Featured Recipes No-bake

Limoncello Granita

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This summer, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse will debut its homemade booze-infused semi-frozen Granita, perfect to enjoy on a hot summer afternoon, like the ones we’ve been seeing in Boston lately. The new take on the Sicilian classic, created by Master Pastry Chef Tom Ponticelli, combines fruity flavors with perfectly paired spirits for a refreshing aperitif. Flavors include Espresso with Chocolate Liqueur, Passion Fruit with Grand Marnier as well as Prickly Pear with Tequila and Lime! They are available for $4 through the end of August.

To celebrate the new line of boozy treats, Davio’s shared one of its recipes with Blast Food.

Davio’s Limoncello Granita

Ingredients

  • 1 qt Water
  • 6 oz Fresh Lemon Verbena Leaves
  • Lemon Zest
  • 2 oz Sugar
  • 2oz Limoncello
  • 1/2 oz Lemon Juice

Directions

  • In a medium size pot, steep water, sugar, lemon verbena.
  • Bring to boil and let steep for 20 min. Wisk in Limoncello and lemon juice.
  • Combine and our ingredients into metal 2-inch hotel pan and place in freezer. Use a dinner fork to scrape any ice crystals that have formed on the side or bottom of the pan.
  • Return to freezer and repeat scraping every 20 to 30 minutes for 3 to 4 hours.
  • Once mixture is thoroughly frozen, fluff with a fork and allow flakes to “dry” in freezer another half hour before serving.

When served, the granita should look like a fluffy pile.

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Alcoholic Boston Restaurants Drinks/Cocktails Featured Recipes

Hurricane-inspired ‘Dark & Sandy’ cocktail from Beacon Hill Hotel & Bistro

If you’re willing to brave the storm, head to Beacon Hill Hotel and Bistro, where  bartenders are shaking up a Frankenstorm-worthy  drink, the Dark & Sandy. Those at home can use the recipe below to stir up their own stormy concoction using a drop of Sandy herself–seriously.

Dark & Sandy Cocktail

Ingredients

  • 4 oz. Ginger Beer
  • 4 oz. Gosling’s Rum
  • 1 Raindrop from Sandy

Directions

Make “Sandy Rim” on glass with brown sugar. Boil rainwater so it’s safe to drink. Mix ingredients, shake and pour over ice. Garnish with Lime Wedge.

Categories
Alcoholic Autumn Boston Restaurants Drinks/Cocktails Featured Recipes Holidays

The Voodoo Child: a Halloween cocktail with a kick

Just in time for Halloween, Boston’s Salvatore’s Restaurant is offering a creepy new cocktail: the Voodoo Child ($10). The concoction is available at all four Salvatore’s Restaurant locations through November, or you can make it yourself…if you dare.

Voodoo Child

Ingredients

  • 1/2 oz. Kraken Spiced Rum
  • 1/2 oz. Bacardi White Rum
  • 1/2 oz. St. Germaine Elderflower Liqueur
  • 1/2 oz. Cointreau
  • 1/2 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
  • 1/2 oz. Fresh Grapefruit Juice
  • 1/2 oz. Bitters
  • 1 Dash of Hot Sauce (6 shakes)

Directions

Shake all ingredients and pour over ice. Garnish with lime slice dipped in cinnamon sugar.

Categories
Alcoholic Autumn Boston Restaurants Drinks/Cocktails Featured Recipes Recipe Sources Recipes

New, sophisticated fall cocktails from Boston’s Beehive

The Beehive, a favorite Boston jazz spot, introduces two new fall cocktails to its menu: the Janie Jones ($12) and the Flying Dutchman Martini ($12). Both drinks are made with Aperol, an Italian spirit with flavors of orange, rhubarb and herbs. Sip these sophisticated concoctions at the ‘hive or impress your friends at home, using the recipes below.

Janie Jones

Janie Jones

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. Hendricks Gin
  • 1 oz. Canton Ginger Liquor
  • ½ oz. Aperol
  • ½ oz. Lemon Juice

Directions

Shake and serve on the rocks in a double rock glass. Garnish with a Lemon Twist.

Flying Dutchman Martini

Ingredients

  • 1 oz. Bols Genever
  • 1 oz. Lillet Blanc
  • ¾ oz. Luxardo Liquor
  • ½ oz. Aperol
  • Dash Lemon Juice
  • Dash Simple Syrup

Directions

Shake on the rocks, strain and serve in a martini glass. Top with Sparkling Wine.


Categories
Alcoholic

The Johnnie Walker Happy Scotsman

This is a pretty basic drink that should be in any whiskey drinker’s repertoire.

Ingredients

  • 1.5 oz Johnnie Walker Black
  • 0.5 oz lemon juice
  • 2 oz hot water
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 10 mint leaves

Directions

Combine ingredients. Muddle mixture, and add the mint leaves. Serve over ice.

Categories
Tips, Tricks, and Advice

Wine pairing basics

(ARA) — You’ve been picking up a bottle of wine along with all the rest of your groceries for years. But have you been doing it right? Ever wondered why certain wines taste so good with certain foods? You’re not alone. The answers are as simple and complex as the varietals you choose with your meal.

Let’s get right down to the meat. No, really, should we be drinking reds with our thick steak and why? It’s all about the tannins – a wine’s pucker power so to speak, which is derived from the grapes’ skins, stems and seeds. Tannins in red wine are powerful, and frankly overpowering for something as light and flaky as a white fish, says Chef Lucia Miltenberger, culinary instructor at The Art Institute of Colorado. “Tannins love a nice marbled ribeye,” she says.

Just when things are getting juicy, it’s time for a chemistry lesson. “Food changes wines in very predictable, scientifically proven ways, and that can be for better or for worse,” says Chef Jane Nickles, culinary academic director at The Art Institute of Austin, a branch of The Art Institute of Houston.

Take acidic foods like salad dressing, ceviche or anything vinegary. If you pair them with an acidic wine like a sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio or a riesling, it will make the wine less acidic – and that’s a good thing. If you’re serving sweeter foods, don’t serve a dry wine like a cabernet sauvignon, merlot or chardonnay, since the sweeter food will make your wine taste less sweet.

Chef Larry Canepa, culinary instructor at The Art Institute of Phoenix, says it’s really all about the sauce. “If you’re serving a heavy white sauce like an alfredo, choose a crisp white wine with some acidity to balance out the richness and fat of the dairy-based sauce,” he says. Conversely, if you’re serving an acidic tomato sauce, balance it out with a tannic red wine.

Another rule of thumb Canepa uses is to pair the dish with a wine from the same region. “If you’re cooking up northern Italian fare, pick out a wine from that region in Italy,” he says.

And if you’re just starting to delve into wines, Miltenberger recommends some balanced whites and reds that both newcomers and wine connoisseurs can enjoy. “If you haven’t had a lot of wine, you could be turned off by the dryness, so a nice balanced riesling or a Vouvray from the Loire Valley in France are a good start. For reds, try an Oregon Pinot Noir or a Beaujolais or Rose d’Anjou from France.” Not only will your palate be happy, but so will your pocketbook. Miltenberger says most of these wines retail for $10 to $15.

With that kind of price point, Canepa’s philosophy is on target, “Wine is not a luxury or an indulgence, it’s an ingredient.” And Nickles sums it up, “The bottom line is simple, food and wine go well together. You can serve any food with any wine and have a better meal.”